Raphael
Raphael's Oil Paintings
Raphael Museum
April 6 or March 28, 1483 – April 6, 1520. Italian painter.

About Us
email

90,680 paintings total now
Toll Free: 1-877-240-4507

  
  

Raphael Gallery.org, welcome & enjoy!
Raphael Gallery.org
 

David Bailly
Self-portrait With Vanitas Symbols
Date 1651(1651) Medium Oil on canvas cjr
ID: 87601

David Bailly Self-portrait With Vanitas Symbols
Go Back!



David Bailly Self-portrait With Vanitas Symbols


Go Back!


 

David Bailly

(1584-1657) was a Dutch Golden Age painter. Bailly was born at Leyden in the Dutch Republic, the son of a Flemish immigrant, calligrapher and fencing master, Peter Bailly. As a draftsman, David was pupil of his father and the copper engraver Jacques de Gheyn. David Bailly apprenticed with a surgeon-painter Adriaan Verburg in Leiden and then with Cornelius van der Voort (1576-1624), a portrait painter in Amsterdam. According to Houbraken, in the winter of 1608, Bailly took his Grand Tour, travelling to Frankfurt, Nuremberg, Augsburg Hamburg, and via Tirol to Venice, and from there to Rome. On his return he spent five months in Venice, all the while working as a journeyman where he could, before crossing the alps again in 1609. On his return voyage, Bailly worked for several German princes including the Duke of Brunswick. Upon his return to the Netherlands in 1613, Bailly began painting still-life subjects and portraits, including self-portraits and portraits of his students and professors at the University of Leiden. He is known for making a number of vanities paintings depicting transience of this life, with such ephemeral symbols as flowers and candles. Bailly taught his nephews Harmen and Pieter Steenwijck.   Related Paintings of David Bailly :. | Bouquet of Flowers | Christ at the Praetorium | A Rake's Progress - Marriage | Portrat der Charlotte Butkens, Herrin von Anoy, mit ihrem Sohn | Arab or Arabic people and life. Orientalism oil paintings 456 |
Related Artists:
Marquis, James Richard
Irish, Scottish heritage, Active 1835-85
Gwen John
Welsh 1876-1939 Gwen John was born in Haverfordwest, Wales, the second of four children of Edwin William John and his wife Augusta (nee Smith). Edwin John was a solicitor whose dour temperament cast a chill over his family, and Augusta was often absent from the children due to ill health, leaving her two sisters??stern Salvationists??to take her place in the household. Despite the considerable tension in the family (who became known as "those turbulent Johns") the children's interest in literature and art was encouraged. Following the mother??s premature death in 1884, the family moved to Tenby in Pembrokeshire, Wales. Although she painted and drew from an early age, her earliest surviving work dates from her nineteenth year. From 1895?C98, she studied at the Slade School of Art, where her younger brother, Augustus John, had begun his studies in 1894. During this period they shared living quarters, and further reduced their expenses by subsisting on a diet of nuts and fruit. Even as a student, Augustus' brilliant draughtsmanship and personal glamour made him a celebrity, and stood in contrast to Gwen's quieter gifts and reticent demeanour. While he greatly admired her art, Augustus offered her advice which she ignored; he urged her to take a "more athletic attitude to life", and cautioned her against what he saw as the "unbecoming and unhygienic negligence" of her mode of living, but her entire life was marked by a disregard for her physical well-being. In 1898 she made her first visit to Paris with two friends from the Slade, and while there she studied under James McNeill Whistler at the Academie Carmen. She returned to London in 1899, and spent the next four years in austere circumstances. When she exhibited her work for the first time in 1900, at the New English Art Club (NEAC), her address was a derelict building where she was living illegally.
Cagnaccio di San Pietro
Italian, 1897-1946,born Natale Bentivoglio Scarpa, was an Italian magic realist painter. He had his artistic training at the Academy of Fine Art in Venice, where he studied under Ettore Tito. Cagnaccio's early paintings were in a Futurist idiom, but by the early 1920s he had adopted a very smoothly brushed, nearly photographic style. His work, which includes portraits, nudes, still lifes, scenes of popular life, and religious pictures, shows the influence of the German painters of the New Objectivity. One of his best-known paintings, After the Orgy (1928) shows three nude women asleep on a floor littered with wine bottles, playing cards and cigarettes.






Raphael
All the Raphael's Oil Paintings




Supported by oil paintings and picture frames 



Copyright Reserved