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April 6 or March 28, 1483 – April 6, 1520. Italian painter.

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Johann Heinrich Fuseli
The Artist Moved by the Grandeur of Antique Fragments
1778-79 Red chalk on sepia wash, 415 x 355 mm Kunsthaus, Z?rich The young Henry Fuseli, in the late 1770s, portrayed himself reduced to despair before the vastness of Rome's remains. Since he had spent eight years studying in the city, his awe was doubtless exaggerated, but it was also a premonition of the powerful emotions that were to be released in his art. Author: FUSELI, John Henry Title: The Artist Moved by the Grandeur of Antique Fragments Form: graphics , 1751-1800 , Swiss , other
ID: 62501

Johann Heinrich Fuseli The Artist Moved by the Grandeur of Antique Fragments
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Johann Heinrich Fuseli The Artist Moved by the Grandeur of Antique Fragments


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Johann Heinrich Fuseli

1741-1825 Romanticism Swiss   Related Paintings of Johann Heinrich Fuseli :. | Die Sunde, vom Tod verfolgt | The Awakening of the Fairy Queen Titania | Theodore Meets in the Wood the Spectre of His Ancestor Guido Cavalcanti | Dante and Virgil on the Ice of Kocythos | Sleep and Death carrying away Sarpedon of Lycia |
Related Artists:
Juan Leon Palliere
painted Idilio criollo in c. 1861
Matteo Rosselli
Italian Baroque Era Painter, 1578-1650 Italian painter. An influential artist of the early 17th century in Florence, he is described by the early sources as being of a gentle disposition and as a dedicated and dignified painter, although he lacked originality and power. His work is characterized by the simplicity, descriptive naturalism and refined colour of the Counter-Reformation art created by such Tuscan artists as Santi di Tito, Bernardino Poccetti, Lodovico Cigoli and Domenico Passignano, yet he was also responsive to Venetian and Emilian art. The son of Alfonso Rosselli and Elena Coppi, he received his early education in Gregorio Pagani's studio, which he attended from as early as 1587. His initial inclination was towards classical and balanced compositions, in which the influence of Andrea del Sarto, whose frescoes he copied in the Chiostro dello Scalzo, is clear. On 26 February 1599 he was admitted to the Accademia del Disegno and in 1605 went to be with Passignano in Rome for six months, greatly enriching his artistic experiences through this contact. He returned to Florence in the same year and, on Pagani's death (1605), completed his master's unfinished works with great success. Pagani's influence can be seen in the bright colours of Rosselli's Adoration of the Magi (1607; Montevarchi, Arezzo, S Andrea). To 1610 belong two monochrome paintings depicting Henry IV at Nantes and Henry IV at Gaudebec
Owen, William
English, 1769-1825 English painter. The son of a bookseller, he was educated at the grammar school in Ludlow and was sent to London in 1786 to study under Charles Catton the elder (1728-98), coach painter to George III and founder-member of the Royal Academy. Owen's copy of a work by Reynolds, made soon after his arrival, attracted the latter's attention. He entered the Royal Academy Schools in 1791 and exhibited at the Royal Academy the following year. From then on he exhibited there every year, apart from 1823 and 1825, and was elected ARA in 1804 and RA in 1806. He painted a number of rural scenes but specialized in portrait painting. Although his reputation was eclipsed by that of Thomas Lawrence, he was sought after by many of the eminent figures of the day, producing portraits of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr William Howley (1813), and of the politician and essayist John Wilson Croker (exh. 1812; both London, N.P.G.); other of his sitters were William Pitt the younger and John Soane. In 1810 he was appointed portrait painter to the Prince of Wales (later George IV) and in 1813 principal portrait painter to the Prince when the latter became Prince Regent. The Prince Regent does not seem to have sat to him but nonetheless he offered Owen a knighthood, which the painter refused. From c. 1820 Owen's health deteriorated until a disease of the spine confined him to his room and finally rendered him incapable of painting. He died after accidentally taking a bottle of opium that had been wrongly labelled.






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