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April 6 or March 28, 1483 – April 6, 1520. Italian painter.

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WOUWERMAN, Philips
Stag Hunt in a River iut7
1650s Oil on canvas, 130 x 190 cm Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh
ID: 09761

WOUWERMAN, Philips Stag Hunt in a River iut7
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WOUWERMAN, Philips Stag Hunt in a River iut7


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WOUWERMAN, Philips

Dutch Baroque Era Painter, 1619-1668. Dutch painters from Haarlem. Dutch painter and draughtsman. He was the eldest son of the painter Paulus [Pauwels] Joostens Wouwerman of Alkmaar (d 28 Sept 1642), whose two other sons, Pieter Wouwerman (1623-82) and Johannes Wouwerman (1629-66), also became painters. Philips probably received his first painting lessons from his father, none of whose work has been identified. According to Cornelis de Bie, Wouwerman was next apprenticed to Frans Hals, although no trace of Hals's influence is discernible in Wouwerman's work. Wouwerman is also reputed to have spent several weeks in 1638 or 1639 working in Hamburg in the studio of the German history painter Evert Decker (d 1647). While in Hamburg, he married Annetje Pietersz. van Broeckhof. On 4 September 1640 Wouwerman joined the Guild of St Luke in Haarlem, in which in 1646 he held the office of vinder (agent or 'finder'). Given the many southern elements in his landscapes, it has repeatedly been suggested that Wouwerman must have travelled to France or Italy, but there is no documentary evidence that he left his native Haarlem for more than short periods. During his lifetime he must have attained a certain degree of prosperity, as demonstrated by the relatively large sums inherited by each of his seven children after his wife's death in 1670.  Related Paintings of WOUWERMAN, Philips :. | The White Horse qrt | Cavalry Skirmish | Stag Hunt in a River iut7 | Riding School 4et | Cavalry Battle in front of a Burning Mill tfur |
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Anders Askevold
(25 December 1834 - 22. October 1900) was a Norwegian landscape painter. Anders Askevold was best known as an animal and landscape painter. Anders Monsen Askevold was born in Askvoll, in Sunnfjord, Norway. He was the second oldest of ten siblings. His father was a teacher. His early training started at the age of thirteen in Bergen under Hans Leganger Reuch (1800-1854) . He was educated as a painter in Desseldorf, but continued his studies in Paris and Munich. Askevold came to Desseldorf in 1855 and stayed for 3 years. He trained in Desseldorf under Professor Hans Gude from 1855 until 1859. He was known as a member of the Desseldorf school with others like Adelsteen Normann. From 1861 to 1866 he was in Paris. In 1866 Askevold moved back to Norway and settled in Bergen. After this he moved back to Desseldorf where he would spend his winters in Germany and his summers in Norway.
Anton Romako
(October 20, 1832 - March 8, 1889) was an Austrian painter. Anton Romako was born in Atzgersdorf (now a district of Liesing, Vienna), as an illegitimate son of factory owner Josef Lepper and his housemaid Elisabeth Maria Anna Romako. He studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (1847-49) but his teacher, Ferdinand Georg Waldmeller, considered him talentless. Later, he studied in Munich (1849) under Wilhelm Kaulbach, and subsequently in Venice, Rome and London. In the early 1850s he studied privately in Vienna under Carl Rahl, whose style Romako adopted. In 1854 he began travels to Italy and Spain and in 1857 settled in Rome as the favourite portrait, genre, and landscape painter for the local colony of foreigners. In 1862 Romako married Sophie Köbel, the daughter of architect Karl Köbel, and the pair had five children before Sophie left Romako in 1875 for her lover. In 1876 Romako returned to Vienna but failed to re-establish himself against the style representend by Hans Makart and increasingly relied on the charity of such wealthy patrons as Count Kuefstein. He made study trips to Hungary, Italy and France, and during the years 1882-84 he alternated between Paris and Geneva. Two daughters, Mathilde and Mary, committed suicide in 1887; Romako had never recovered from the shock. His last years were spent living in neglect near Vienna, where he died in poverty in 1889. Romako was buried at the Central cemetery in Vienna. In 1953 a street in Atzgersdorf was named after the painter: Romakogasse. Anton Romako's painting "The battle of Lissa" was selected as a motive for a recent commemorative coin: the 20 euro S.M.S. Erzherzog Ferdinand Max minted on September 15, 2004. His brother, Joseph von Romako, was a Naval Architect-Inspector of Austro-Hungarian Navy.
Jacob Jordaens
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